Archive for the ‘Books received’ Category

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I haven’t done a ‘books in the post’ entry for some time (usually because I’m too busy reading or destroying my body by “staying fit” and grappling). But, I’ve been sent a bunch of really interesting books lately and I wanted to showcase just how many cool titles I have in the review pipeline.

Rougue One has clearly been popular in the cinema, though I doubt my wife and I will get the opportunity to watch it there. This novelisation is high on my list not only because of the movie but as I really enjoy shared world books and Star Wars immensely.

Similarly, The Massacre of Mankind by Stephen Baxter is drawing my attention. A sequel to War of the Worlds that is set 14 years after the first book, this is the story of the next invasion.

James Barclay’s latest fantasy offering, Heart of Granite has been tucked away for a while but it’s definitely peaked my fantasy interest of late. Equally, Miles Cameron’s sequel to The Red Knight is making a good argument to jump to the top of the list.

Abandon books have been kind enough to send my The El Sombra Trilogy, a weird pulp offering from Al Ewing. The cover alone has me excited and the blurb speaks of superheroes, nazi hunting and frightening monsters…sounds awesome!

On the flip side is the evocative and enigmatic sounding Invisible Planets by Hannu Rajaniemi. A collection of exploratory short stories and different types of writing, this anthology of work has all the potential to be great.

Alex Lamb’s Roboteer had me from the first press release. A debut novel, the ideas propounded in the blurb create an enthralling premise for a sci-fi book, one I’m eager to read. And, on a similar level is Escapology by Ren Waram. A cyberpunk thriller that paints a picture of a terrifying future – it’s been on my shelf too long and definitely deserves reviewing soon.

So, now to decide which book to read first. Where do you think I should start?

Following on from my recent revelations via actually reading my emails, I’ve also come across a netgalley haul of awesome titles that I’ve been approved to read – that includes the new short story collection from Joe Abercrombie (fist pump for gritty fantasy).. There’s also some very cool sounding novels from a few writers I’ve not encountered before that I’m eager to read. So, blurbs and covers below and reviews will be forthcoming..

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In this gritty and innovative science-fiction thriller in the vein of Philip K. Dick’s Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, turmoil on one of Saturn’s moons rattles Earth’s most powerful citizens—and draws one planet-hopping rogue into a fight he never saw coming.

Malcolm Graves lives by two rules: finish the job, and get paid. After thirty years as a collector, chasing bounties and extinguishing rebellions throughout the solar system, Malcolm does what he’s told, takes what he’s earned, and leaves the questions to someone else—especially when it comes to the affairs of offworlders.

But his latest mission doesn’t afford him that luxury. After a high-profile bombing on Earth, the men who sign Malcolm’s paychecks are clamoring for answers. Before he can object, the corporation teams him up with a strange new partner who’s more interested in statistics than instinct and ships them both off to Titan, the disputed moon where humans have been living for centuries. Their assignment is to hunt down a group of extremists: Titanborn dissidents who will go to any length to free their home from the tyranny of Earth.

Heading into hostile territory, Malcolm will have to use everything he’s learned to stay alive. But he soon realizes that the situation on the ground is much more complex than he anticipated . . . and much more personal.

Amoral protagonist? Off-world terrorism? Fight for survival? Check – I’m in.

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A worldwide diaspora has left a quarter of a million people at the foot of a space station. Cultures collide in real life and virtual reality. The city is literally a weed, its growth left unchecked. Life is cheap, and data is cheaper.

When Boris Chong returns to Tel Aviv from Mars, much has changed. Boris’s ex-lover is raising a strangely familiar child who can tap into the datastream of a mind with the touch of a finger. His cousin is infatuated with a robotnik—a damaged cyborg soldier who might as well be begging for parts. His father is terminally-ill with a multigenerational mind-plague. And a hunted data-vampire has followed Boris to where she is forbidden to return.

Rising above them is Central Station, the interplanetary hub between all things: the constantly shifting Tel Aviv; a powerful virtual arena, and the space colonies where humanity has gone to escape the ravages of poverty and war. Everything is connected by the Others, powerful alien entities who, through the Conversation—a shifting, flowing stream of consciousness—are just the beginning of irrevocable change.

Post-human virtuality written by Lavie Tidhar – sounds good to me.

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In this dark and gripping sci-fi noir, an exiled police detective arrives at a lunar penal colony just as a psychotic android begins a murderous odyssey across the far side of the moon.

Purgatory is the lawless moon colony of eccentric billionaire, Fletcher Brass: a mecca for war criminals, murderers, sex fiends, and adventurous tourists. You can’t find better drugs, cheaper plastic surgery, or a more ominous travel advisory anywhere in the universe. But trouble is brewing in Brass’s black-market heaven. When an exiled cop arrives in this wild new frontier, he immediately finds himself investigating a string of ruthless assassinations in which Brass himself—and his equally ambitious daughter—are the chief suspects.

Meanwhile, two-thousand kilometers away, an amnesiac android, Leonardo Black, rampages across the lunar surface. Programmed with only the notorious “Brass Code”—a compendium of corporate laws that would make Ayn Rand blush—Black has only one goal in mind: to find Purgatory and conquer it.

Hard sci-fi, crime noir, action thriller…another firm yes.

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The Union army may be full of bastards, but there’s only one who thinks he can save the day single-handed when the Gurkish come calling: the incomparable Colonel Sand dan Glokta.
Curnden Craw and his dozen are out to recover a mysterious item from beyond the Crinna. Only one small problem: no one seems to know what the item is.

Shevedieh, the self-styled best thief in Styria, lurches from disaster to catastrophe alongside her best friend and greatest enemy, Javre, Lioness of Hoskopp.

And after years of bloodshed, the idealistic chieftain Bethod is desperate to bring peace to the North. There’s only one obstacle left – his own lunatic champion, the most feared man in the North: the Bloody-Nine . . .

Not much to say other than, I can’t wait to read more First Law world stories..

After scraping the barrel at the local charity shops and lamenting the complete lack of anything sci-fi or fantasy related, I’m very grateful to have been sent some great looking books. Take a look at the titles and blurbs below…

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Alan Moore, the man who revolutionized comics, returns to tell a horrifying tale in the world of Garth Ennis’ grueling survival horror series, Crossed! Set 100 years in the future, Alan Moore has created a whole new world and history with stunning attention to detail. Examining how civilizations rebuild and how generations grow, Moore weaves a rich tapestry of humanity evolving under extreme hardship, all of which is lushly rendered by Gabriel (Ferals) Andrade. Archivist Future Taylor leads a salvage team working to rebuild the historical record of the original Crossed outbreak. She’s seen them in videos, but never any live ones – the Crossed are part of the distant past. Until suddenly, a handful appear, and the blood begins to flow.

I’ve taken a peak at this already and it looks brutal – awesome, but brutal.

I’ve also been sent e-copies of Mike Resnick’s latest series and I’m looking forward to getting stuck into these as well.

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The Democracy is at war with the alien Traanskei Coalition. War hero Colonel Nathan Pretorius has a record of success on dangerous behind-enemy-lines missions, missions that usually leave him in the hospital. Now he’s recruited for a near-impossible assignment that may well leave him dead. At the cost of many lives, the Democracy has managed to clone and train General Michkag, one of the Traanskei’s master strategists. Colonel Pretorius and a hand-picked team must kidnap the real Michkag if they can, assassinate him if they can’t, but no matter which, put the clone in his place, where he will misdirect the enemy’s forces and funnel vital information to the Democracy. Against the odds, Pretorius, along with Cyborg Felix Ortega, computer expert Toni Levi, convict and contortionist Sally “Snake” Kowalski, the near-human empath Marlowe, the alien Gzychurlyx, and Madam Methuselah – the Dead Enders – must infiltrate the Fortress in Orion, accomplish their mission, and escape with their lives.”

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The Traanskei Coalition’s greatest weapon is the Q bomb, and after years of failure, the Democracy has come up with a defense against it. The problem is that they killed most of the team that created it. The sole survivor, Edgar Nmumba, was kidnapped by the Coalition. Only Nmumba can duplicate the work fast enough to prevent the loss of another dozen populated planets.

Nathan Pretorius and his team of Dead Enders will require all their skills and cunning to rescue him, sane and in one piece, from the Coalition’s best-hidden and best-guarded prison, somewhere in the Antares sector. But in a game of cross and double-cross, can they find him before it’s too late?

Titan Books have sent me a bunch of great looking novels – lucky me! First up is Tanya Huff’s An Ancient Peace and I have to admit I’m very tempted to start on this today..

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The centuries-long war between the Confederation and The Others, a group of violent alien species, is over. Intergalactic peace is finally restored. Torin Kerr and her crew of ex-Marine friends have gone freelance – using their military experience as guns for hire. But this calm equilibrium cannot last.

Someone is searching for the lost weapons of the H’san: powerful tools capable of destroying entire planets. Though the H’san gave up fighting long ago, the reappearance of their weapons would no doubt lead to a devastating war. It’s up to Torin Kerr and her team to fix this problem before it explodes. But the more Torin learns about the relationship between the Elder and Younger races, the more she fears war might be unavoidable…

Next up is Hallow Point by Ari Marmell. As he’s the author who introduced me to the steampunk sub genre, I’m definitely keen to see what his latest novel offers (bonus points for an awesome cover as well)..

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The Spear of Lugh, one of the four Kingly Hallows of Ireland is in Chicago. And everyone, everyone wants it, for it is said that he who carries the spear into battle cannot be defeated. Among those who seek it are an agent of the infamous Wild Hunt; a mobster who knows far more about these things than he should; and of course both the Seelie and Unseelie Courts – the last people PI Mick Oberon would want getting hold of the spear…

Then there’s a book each from two prolific writers: Adam Christopher and James Lovegrove both featuring crime, intrigue and machine intelligence..

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Raymond Electromatic is good at his job, as good as he ever was at being a true Private Investigator, the lone employee of the Electromatic Detective Agency–except for Ada, office gal and super-computer, the constant voice in Ray’s inner ear. Ray might have taken up a new line of work, but money is money, after all, and he was programmed to make a profit. Besides, with his twenty-four-hour memory-tape limits, he sure can keep a secret.

When a familiar-looking woman arrives at the agency wanting to hire Ray to find a missing movie star, he’s inclined to tell her to take a hike. But she had the cold hard cash, a demand for total anonymity, and tendency to vanish on her own.

Plunged into a glittering world of fame, fortune, and secrecy, Ray uncovers a sinister plot that goes much deeper than the silver screen–and this robot is at the wrong place, at the wrong time.

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March 1895. Hilary Term at Oxford. In the newly built extension to the University Galleries, Professor Quantock has put the finishing touches to a wondrous computational device which, he claims, is capable of analytical thought to rival that of the cleverest men alive. Indeed, his so-called Thinking Engine seems equal to Sherlock Holmes himself in its deductive powers.

To prove his point, Quantock programmes his machine to solve a murder in the Jericho area which has been baffling Oxford police. The Engine identifies a suspect who proves not to have a valid alibi for the night of the crime. The man is duly arrested and arraigned.

Sherlock Holmes cannot ignore this challenge. He and Watson travel to Oxford, where a battle of wits ensues between the great detective and his mechanical counterpart as they compete to see which of them can be first to solve a series of crimes. As man and machine vie for supremacy, it becomes clear that the Thinking Engine has its own agenda. Holmes’s and Watson’s lives are on the line as a ghost from the past catches up with them…

It’s a lot of books and I’m very grateful to the kind people at Prometheus Books and the generous folks at Titan Books – my lack of a reading pile just got very populated!

Thanks to all the kind publishers and even kinder publicity and media types who facilitate us reviewers and bloggers, I received a few great (e-copy) books recently.

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Great cover, great blurb…

Convicted criminal James Griffin-Mars is no one’s hero. In his time, Earth is a toxic, abandoned world and humans have fled into the outer solar system to survive, eking out a fragile, doomed existence among the other planets and their moons. Those responsible for delaying humanity’s demise believe time travel holds the key, and they have identified James, troubled though he is, as one of a select and expendable few ideally suited for the most dangerous job in history.

James is a chronman, undertaking missions into Earth’s past to recover resources and treasure without altering the timeline. The laws governing use of time travel are absolute; break any one of them and, one way or another, your life is over. Most chronmen never reach old age; the stress of each jump through time, compounded by the risk to themselves and to the future, means that many chronmen rapidly reach their breaking point, and James Griffin-Mars is nearing his.

On a final mission that is to secure his retirement, James meets Elise Kim, an intriguing scientist from a previous century, who is fated to die during the destruction of an oceanic rig. Against his training and his common sense, and in violation of the chronmen’s highest law, James brings Elise back to the future with him, saving her life, but turning them both into fugitives. Remaining free means losing themselves in the wild and poisonous wastes of Earth, somehow finding allies, and perhaps discovering what hope may yet remain for humanity’s home world.

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Ready Player One is amongst my favourite books, so the next novel by Ernest Cline is a must. Check out the blurb..

Zack Lightman has spent his life dreaming. Dreaming that the real world could be a little more like the countless science-fiction books, movies, and videogames he’s spent his life consuming. Dreaming that one day, some fantastic, world-altering event will shatter the monotony of his humdrum existence and whisk him off on some grand space-faring adventure.

But hey, there’s nothing wrong with a little escapism, right? After all, Zack tells himself, he knows the difference between fantasy and reality. He knows that here in the real world, aimless teenage gamers with anger issues don’t get chosen to save the universe.

And then he sees the flying saucer.

Even stranger, the alien ship he’s staring at is straight out of the videogame he plays every night, a hugely popular online flight simulator called Armada—in which gamers just happen to be protecting the earth from alien invaders.

No, Zack hasn’t lost his mind. As impossible as it seems, what he’s seeing is all too real. And his skills—as well as those of millions of gamers across the world—are going to be needed to save the earth from what’s about to befall it.

It’s Zack’s chance, at last, to play the hero. But even through the terror and exhilaration, he can’t help thinking back to all those science-fiction stories he grew up with, and wondering: Doesn’t something about this scenario seem a little…familiar?

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Written by a former Canadian Naval officer, I’m expecting top-notch military sci-fi. Check the blurb..

The Terran military, the Astral Force, launches a mission to crush a colonial rebellion on the Centauri colony. Although Expeditionary Force 15 succeeds, the surviving veterans remain scarred—physically and emotionally, and the consequences of their actions follow them back to Earth when terrorists seek to exact catastrophic revenge.

Lieutenant Katja Emmes is a platoon commander, leader of the 10-trooper strike team aboard the fast-attack craft Rapier. Although fully trained, she has never led troops in real operations before, and lives in the shadow of her war-hero father. Sublieutenant Jack Mallory is fresh out of pilot school, daydreaming about a fighter pilot position in the space fleet. He is in for a rude awakening. Lieutenant Commander Thomas Kane uses a six-month deployment in command of Rapier is to secure his rise to stardom within the Astral Force. He also plays the subtle politics of the military.

After moving half way across the world with my wife and son, I don’t get as many books posted to me as I used to. This makes me sad but, on the plus side, extremely happy when I do receive stuff! I’ve been sent a couple of books I’m definitely interested to read but, with my son’s crazy non-napping ways, my reading time has been drastically reduced. Still, more books for the ‘to-be-read’ pile is never a bad thing (though I suspect my wife would strongly disagree..).

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Fish Tails by Sheri S. Tepper looks like one helluva book..

In her 35th stand-alone novel, science fiction master Sheri S. Tepper boldly weaves together the storylines of eleven of her previous works – from KING’S BLOOD FOUR (1983) to THE WATERS RISING (2010).

In FISH TAILS, two of Tepper’s beloved characters – Abasio and Xulai (A PLAGUE OF ANGELS and THE WATERS RISING) – and their children travel from village to village scattered across the sparsely populated land of Tingawa. They are searching for others who might be interested in adopting their sea-dwelling lifestyle.

Edge of Dark by Brenda Cooper not only has an awesome
Looking cover but also a crazy premise. Cooper is an author I keep meaning to get to reading; maybe this is the time to get it done.

What if a society banished its worst nightmare to the far edge of the solar system, destined to sip only dregs of light and struggle for the barest living. And yet, that life thrived? It grew and learned and became far more than you ever expected, and it wanted to return to the sun. What if it didn’t share your moral compass in any way?

The Glittering Edge duology describes the clash of forces when an advanced society that has filled a solar system with flesh and blood life meets the near-AI’s that it banished long ago. This is a story of love for the wild and natural life on a colony planet, complex adventure set in powerful space stations, and the desire to live completely whether you are made of flesh and bone or silicon and carbon fiber.

In Edge of Dark, meet ranger Charlie Windar and his adopted wild predator, and explore their home on a planet that has been raped and restored more than once. Meet Nona Hall, child of power and privilege from the greatest station in the system, the Diamond Deep. Meet Nona’s best friend, a young woman named Chrystal who awakens in a robotic body….

I was also emailed an e-copy of Finn Fancy Necromancy by Randy Henderson, billed by Titan Books as being in the same vain as Ready Player One by Ernie Cline.

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It’s 1986 and when a fifteen year old Finn is found guilty of a crime he didn’t commit he’s banished to the Other Realm for twenty five years. But now he’s back and free to walk the mortal world again. Things have changed though and he’s disappointed to have to come to terms with the fact that he’s middle aged and DeLorians can’t fly (we’ve all had to deal with that disappointment!). If that’s not bad enough someone’s framing him for necromancy…again.

He’s got three days to clear his name, win the girl and learn how to cope with his car crash of a family. Easy, right?

I’m currently reading a secondhand copy of Sundiver by David Brin but I think Finn Fancy Necromancy may well be my next port of call….

In the modern age of email there’s nothing better than getting a parcel in the post. Well, other than three surprise packages! All, of course, accompanied by the local, potty mouthed, Jekyll and Hyde postie’s inimitable delivery style..

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The Quick by Lauren Owen has a cryptic blurb attached adding to the gothic horror that awaits inside. I’ve overdosed slightly on zombie novels lately but I think this could be a good, scary read.

You are about to discover the secrets of The Quick –

But first you must travel to Victorian Yorkshire, and there, on a remote country estate, meet a brother and sister alone in the world and bound by tragedy. In time, you will enter the rooms of London’s mysterious Aegolius Club – a society of some of the richest, most powerful men in fin-de-siecle England. And at some point – we cannot say when – these worlds will collide.

It is then, and only then, that a new world emerges, one of romance, adventure and the most delicious of horrors – and the secrets of The Quick are revealed.

I’ve been looking forward to reading more John Scalzi and especially liked the premise of Locked In. Check out the description.

Fifteen years from now, a new virus sweeps the globe. 95% of those afflicted experience nothing worse than fever and headaches. 4% suffer acute meningitis, creating the largest medical crisis in history. And 1% find themselves ‘locked in’ – fully awake and aware, but unable to move or respond to stimulus.

1% doesn’t seem like a lot. But in the US that’s 1.7 million people ‘locked in’ . . . including the President’s wife and daughter.

Spurred by grief and the sheer magnitude of the suffering, America undertakes a massive scientific initiative. Nothing can fully restore the locked in. But then two new technologies emerge. One is a virtual-reality environment, ‘The Agora’, where the locked-in can interact with other humans, whether locked-in ornot. The other is the discovery that a few rare individuals have brains that are receptive to being controlled by others, allowing those who are locked in to occasionally ‘ride’ these people and use their bodies as if they were their own.

This skill is quickly regulated, licensed, bonded, and controlled. Nothing can go wrong. Certainly nobody would be tempted to misuse it, for murder, for political power, or worse . . .

I’ve heard good things about Andy Weir’s The Martian and I have a feeling this may make it to the top of the reading pile. Formerly self published and now with the film rights picked up by Fox, there’s a lot of hype to this novel. Check out the blurb below.

I’m stranded on Mars.

I have no way to communicate with Earth.

I’m in a Habitat designed to last 31 days.

If the Oxygenator breaks down, I’ll suffocate. If the Water Reclaimer breaks down, I’ll die of thirst. If the Hab breaches, I’ll just kind of explode. If none of those things happen, I’ll eventually run out of food and starve to death.

So yeah. I’m screwed

What a great Saturday surprise (including the posties choice use of the English language’s more colourful side)! Now, back to reading…

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Whilst the postie around our way delights in cursing those of us who deign to have parcels delivered, I missed the wrath and colourful language of her this week and had to make do with a trip to the post office. But what a great trip.

The very wonderful people at Little, Brown Book Group (who publish Orbit books in the UK) sent me a couple of fantastic titles. I am truly a very lucky reader and can’t wait to get stuck in.

First up, Blood Song by Anthony Ryan. It’s a book that’s been on my radar for a while and I’m really looking forward to getting to read this very soon.

We have fought battles that left more than a hundred corpses on the ground and not a word of it has ever been set down. The Order fights, but often it fights in shadow, without glory or reward. We have no banners. Vaelin Al Sorna is the Sixth Order’s newest recruit. Under their brutal training regime, he learns how to forge a blade, survive the wilds and kill a man quickly and quietly – all in the name of protecting the Realm and the Faith. Now his skills will be put to the test. War is coming. Vaelin must draw upon the very essence of his strength and cunning if he is to survive the coming conflict. Yet as the world teeters on the edge of chaos, Vaelin will learn that the truth can cut deeper than any sword.

Next is D.J. Molles The Remaining – Refugees. Unfortunately, this is the third book in the series but, again, I’ve heard a lot of hype about this over the internet and I definitely want to read the author’s work. Hopefully, I’ll get my hands on the first couple of novels in the series soon.

He has fought the fight, and run the race.

But the enemies never stop coming, and the race has no finish line.

It has been three months since Captain Lee Harden found the survivors at Camp Ryder. With winter looming, Lee is on the verge of establishing Camp Ryder as a hub of safety and stability in the region. But not everyone agrees with Lee’s mission . . . or his methods. Growing tensions between camp leadership are coming to a head, and as Lee struggles amid the dissention and controversy, new revelations about the infected threaten to destroy everything he has worked for.

Lastly comes Angus Watson’s Age of Iron. The blurb sounds great and I’m really keen to check out the novel. I think this may get pushed to the top of the pile…

LEGENDS AREN’T BORN. THEY’RE FORGED.

Dug Sealskinner is a down-on-his-luck mercenary travelling south to join up with King Zadar’s army. But he keeps rescuing the wrong people.

First, Spring, a child he finds scavenging on the battlefield, and then Lowa, one of Zadar’s most fearsome warriors, who’s vowed revenge on the king for her sister’s execution.

Now Dug’s on the wrong side of that thousands-strong army he hoped to join ­- and worse, Zadar has bloodthirsty druid magic on his side. All Dug has is his war hammer, one rescued child and one unpredictable, highly-trained warrior with a lust for revenge that’s going to get them all killed . . .

It’s a glorious day to die.

What are you reading?

Books in the post…!

Posted: July 1, 2014 in Books received
Tags: ,

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I always feel very lucky to get sent review copies and recently received a few really interesting looking books.

Koko takes a Holiday by Kieran Shea not only has a fantastic cover but a seriously impressive bunch of strap lines boasting its brilliance. I’m definitely going to get stuck into this very soon.

Five hundred years from now, ex-corporate mercenary Koko Martstellar is swaggering through an easy early retirement as a brothel owner on The Sixty Islands, a manufactured tropical resort archipelago known for its sex and simulated violence. Surrounded by slang-drooling boywhores and synthetic komodo dragons, Koko finds the most challenging part of her day might be deciding on her next drink. That is, until her old comrade Portia Delacompte sends a squad of security personnel to murder her.

Whilst I don’t read much tie-in fiction I am fascinated by the idea of working within a set intellectual property and what that entails. Also, who didn’t love the original Planet of the Apes film?

The official prequel novel to the brand-new movie Dawn of the Planet of the Apes bridges the gap between the events of the box-office smash Rise of the Planet of the Apes and the much-anticipated sequel, as well as offering fans the full story that leads into the action on screen.

Sword of the Bright Lady by M.C Planck has an intriguing premise. Magic, monsters, gods and demons all faced by a mild mannered engineer. Could be a winner..

Christopher Sinclair goes out for a walk on a mild Arizona evening and never comes back. He stumbles into a freezing winter under an impossible night sky, where magic is real — but bought at a terrible price.

A misplaced act of decency lands him in a brawl with an arrogant nobleman and puts him under a death sentence. In desperation he agrees to be drafted into an eternal war, serving as a priest of the Bright Lady, Goddess of Healing. But when Marcius, god of war, offers the only hope of a way home to his wife, Christopher pledges to him instead, plunging the church into turmoil and setting him on a path of violence and notoriety.

To win enough power to open a path home, this mild-mannered mechanical engineer must survive duelists, assassins, and the never-ending threat of monsters, with only his makeshift technology to compete with swords and magic.

But the gods and demons have other plans. Christopher’s fate will save the world… or destroy it.

I’ve heard about Samit Basu’s novel Resistance and I’m really excited to get a copy. I can see this getting bumped up the ‘to be read’ pile very quickly.

Eleven years after the passengers of flight BA142 from London to Delhi developed extraordinary abilities corresponding to their innermost desires, the world is overrun with supers. Some use their powers for good, others for evil, and some just want to smash up iconic monuments and get on TV. But now someone is hunting down supers, killing heroes and villains both, and it’s up to the Unit to stop them…

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Having spent all weekend climbing up and down a 20ft ladder, fixing render and painting the house, not much reading or blogging was achieved. However, lucky me did get sent a number of great looking books to ease those aching legs and slightly frayed nerves (my son is teething, poor boy and poor wife).

I’ve not had the chance to read Terry Pratchett and Stephen Baxter’s previous collaborations – The Long Earth and The Long War but they sound great. More books to add to the list!

I have, however, read Stephanie Saulter’s first offering in her Revolution series and I’m really looking forward to Binary. Check out the blurb below.

Zavcka Klist has reinvented herself: no longer the ruthless gemtech enforcer determined to keep the gems they created enslaved, she’s now all about transparency and sharing the fruits of Bel’Natur’s research to help gems and norms alike.

Neither Aryel Morningstar nor Dr Eli Walker are convinced that Klist or Bel’Natur can have changed so dramatically, but the gems have problems that only a gemtech can solve. In exchange for their help, digital savant Herran agrees to work on Klist’s latest project: reviving the science that drove mankind to the brink of extinction.

Then confiscated genestock disappears from a secure government facility, and the more DI Varsi investigates, the closer she comes to the dark heart of Bel’Natur and what Zavcka Klist is really after – not to mention the secrets of Aryel Morningstar’s own past…

Another book that I’m eager to read is Ian McDonald’s Empress of the Sun. The third book in his Planesrunner series, I’d want to read it for the cover artwork alone.

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Finally, I was sent the first two books in Anna Thayer’s The Knight of Eldaran series. The blurb sounds interesting enough for me to add to the To Be Read pile….which is towering…

I’m still reading Sphinx by James Thornton and it’s definitely setting an interesting premise. Review should be up soon (as there is no way I’m going back up the ladder this week). What are you reading?