Archive for May, 2018

I heard about Turbo Kid when it came out but didn’t get the chance to watch it until I spied a late night TV showing of the film and recorded it. I’m so glad I did. It’s a modern take on all the awesome 80’s sci-fi post-apocalyptic adventure movies, mashing up tropes and ideas into one brilliantly balanced episode. Plus, it features Michael Ironside (the baddy from Total Recall) as the antagonist.

Set in a post-apocalypse, where water is more than scarce and a possible robot uprising expidiated the end of society, Turbo Kid is bonkers. The “kid” is an orphan, living by his wits and scavenging the wasteland for things to trade, especially for ‘Turbo Rider’ comics. Emulating his hero, the Kid navigates the wasteland on his trusty BMX when he is forcefully befriended by Apple, an overly enthusiastic and amicable girl. And, here, is where things get mental. Apple is kidnapped by some nefarious thugs, notably a mute mask wearing henchman called Skeletron. Taken back to the big bad bosses HQ, she is thrown into the pit – a fighting arena used purely for violent entertainment where the dead are crushed by a machine and turned into water; the same water all the people of the wasteland trade for.

What ensues is a wild adventure as the Kid tries to save Apple with the help of an arm wrestling champion cowboy, another pit victim. Twists and turns abound as Zeus (played by Ironside) tracks them down. She turns out to be a robot, the cowboy a tough but fair ally and the Kid a resourceful hero as the film ends in an impressively epic showdown. The violence is gory but tongue-in-cheek and the tropes laid on thick and fast yet with originality. There’s an impressive retro feel to the film that permeates it’s visuals and effects yet it’s a great movie that tells a unique story.

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The final instalment in this creature-feature, arachnid-apocalypse, horror series is a satisfying and entertaining read. As ‘they’ like to say – things have to get worse before they can get better; Zero Day epitomises this perfectly. The previous novels (reviewed here and here) set up this brilliant conclusion, tying in all the threads of the plot perfectly.

With the American President under immense pressure to act from her military advisers, nuclear bombs are dropped on U.S soil, the country torn apart and divided. Yet, it’s still not enough. However, a rag-tag group of survivors working in different parts of the country hone in on a way to defeat the spiders. Scientist Melanie Guyer’s research discovers ever more frightening aspects of the aptly named ‘hellspiders’ whilst backwood geniuses Shotgun and Gordo reconfigure their invention from failed weapon to arachnid tracking device.

Much like Guyer, their research doesn’t make things better. At all. The spiders in Boone’s novels just get scarier and scarier as the books go on and, in Zero Day, things really get worrying. Sprinkled in amongst all the big plays are numerous side stories adding to and painting the bigger picture perfectly. There’s great moments, some apocalyptically wild and some heartfelt and touching. But, Boone keeps the pressure rolling. A military coup, a final queen-sized hatching of new-and-improved spiders and a countdown to the end of days.

It’s a great finish to a very readable set of novels, perfectly balanced between adventure and horror.

Review copy

Published by Gollancz