Archive for May, 2018

The Takeshi Kovacs series by Richard K Morgan are among some of my favourite books. The world building and vision is astounding whilst the gritty and cynical protagonist, coupled with the hectic action, combines to form a top notch cyberpunk novel. Thankfully, the Netflix produced T.V series captured all of this in full technicolour.

For those not in the know (unlikely), Altered Carbon is a crime thriller set in a far future where humanity has achieved the ability to download one’s personality and, in theory, live forever by using different ‘sleeves’ or bodies. Space travel is possible by needlecasting; sending your personality data to be downloaded into another body. The possibilities of the tech are far-reaching, creating a fecund and fascinating culture as a background to an intriguing story.

Takeshi Kovacs is one of those used to being resleeved. An Envoy with special training he is tasked with unravelling the mystery of why an obnoxiously wealthy man, who is basically immortal, would kill himself. The man in question has, himself, resleeved and questions abound; was he killed or did he commit suicide.

The resulting merry-go-round that Kovacs finds himself upon is both brutal and eye-opening. He uncovers all manner of disturbing truths about the unobtainably rich, called Meths, such as his employer’s predilection for rape/murder. There are worlds within worlds and layers upon layers of deceptions and double backs as people scrabble for power and status.

The T.V. Series is a visual riot grasping the world Richard K Morgan has created with a brilliance that dazzles. Equally, Kovacs, played by Joel Kinnaman, is wonderfully jaded yet excellently threatening. The weirdness of the ‘sleeves’ is captured amazingly well, causing a considered disturbance to much of the story whilst the action is violent and breathtaking. The series even got the A.I. hotel down too.

Whilst there might be a few niggles ( why they changed Kovacs backstory as an Envoy from the original book version), this is a thoroughly enjoyable, sumptuously created piece of visual entertainment. I’m really looking forward to the next season because, if it’s anything like the books, it should be awesome.

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Following on from An Ancient Peace, Tanya Huff’s next novel in the series is, to put it mildly, awesome. Still trying to find her place as a Warden, ex- Gunnery Sargeant Kerr and her motley crew continue to work to keep the peace in a universe recovering from decades of war and the knowledge that it was a manufactured experiment by a bizarrely alien species.

After stopping a shipment of weapons from being sold illegally, Kerr and her team begin to uncover a plot designed to destabilise the peace between the ‘Elder’ races and newer members of the Confederation (such as Humans) as well as their old enemies, the Primacy. But, things are complicated. Not only is Kerr restricted by her new position as a Warden (and the Elder races obsession against the use of force) but she and her team must strive to keep the fragile treaties in place between the Confederation and Primacy.

All of that is made more difficult with the next mission handed to Kerr and her squad. When scientists discover plastic on a world where civilisation has disappeared en masse, a third party of mercenaries take the scientists hostage thinking the discovery of a plastic alien destroying weapon has been made. Adding even more complexity to the situation, Kerr is assigned a team of Primacy counterparts to accompany the rescue attempt.

Tanya Huff uses the set piece of the rescue mission to unpack and explore all the political intrigue and machinations of her universe. Old enemies are forced to work together, former soldiers broken by war and abandoned by their governments struggle to find peace, and bigoted extremists justify their racist ideologies as they seek revenge in all the wrong places. The boundaries are constantly blurred and redrawn as the hostages, mercenaries, Wardens and Primacy agents struggle to achieve their aims all against the backdrop of the plastic aliens’ troubling presence.

A Peace Divided, manages to be both action packed and thrilling whilst also considering some interesting ideas about post-war politics and cultural divides (as well as showing the total idiocy and pointlessness of racism). Behind the rescue mission stands a nefarious yet powerful antagonist, one who will no doubt appear later in the series, as Kerr and her strike team manage to overcome the odds and, once more, display what makes them such an elite force.

Huff continues her amazing world building, delving deeper into the politics of the situation whilst producing a fantastic, fun and frantic read. Personally, I can’t wait for more.

Review copy

Published by Titan Books

I heard about Turbo Kid when it came out but didn’t get the chance to watch it until I spied a late night TV showing of the film and recorded it. I’m so glad I did. It’s a modern take on all the awesome 80’s sci-fi post-apocalyptic adventure movies, mashing up tropes and ideas into one brilliantly balanced episode. Plus, it features Michael Ironside (the baddy from Total Recall) as the antagonist.

Set in a post-apocalypse, where water is more than scarce and a possible robot uprising expidiated the end of society, Turbo Kid is bonkers. The “kid” is an orphan, living by his wits and scavenging the wasteland for things to trade, especially for ‘Turbo Rider’ comics. Emulating his hero, the Kid navigates the wasteland on his trusty BMX when he is forcefully befriended by Apple, an overly enthusiastic and amicable girl. And, here, is where things get mental. Apple is kidnapped by some nefarious thugs, notably a mute mask wearing henchman called Skeletron. Taken back to the big bad bosses HQ, she is thrown into the pit – a fighting arena used purely for violent entertainment where the dead are crushed by a machine and turned into water; the same water all the people of the wasteland trade for.

What ensues is a wild adventure as the Kid tries to save Apple with the help of an arm wrestling champion cowboy, another pit victim. Twists and turns abound as Zeus (played by Ironside) tracks them down. She turns out to be a robot, the cowboy a tough but fair ally and the Kid a resourceful hero as the film ends in an impressively epic showdown. The violence is gory but tongue-in-cheek and the tropes laid on thick and fast yet with originality. There’s an impressive retro feel to the film that permeates it’s visuals and effects yet it’s a great movie that tells a unique story.

The final instalment in this creature-feature, arachnid-apocalypse, horror series is a satisfying and entertaining read. As ‘they’ like to say – things have to get worse before they can get better; Zero Day epitomises this perfectly. The previous novels (reviewed here and here) set up this brilliant conclusion, tying in all the threads of the plot perfectly.

With the American President under immense pressure to act from her military advisers, nuclear bombs are dropped on U.S soil, the country torn apart and divided. Yet, it’s still not enough. However, a rag-tag group of survivors working in different parts of the country hone in on a way to defeat the spiders. Scientist Melanie Guyer’s research discovers ever more frightening aspects of the aptly named ‘hellspiders’ whilst backwood geniuses Shotgun and Gordo reconfigure their invention from failed weapon to arachnid tracking device.

Much like Guyer, their research doesn’t make things better. At all. The spiders in Boone’s novels just get scarier and scarier as the books go on and, in Zero Day, things really get worrying. Sprinkled in amongst all the big plays are numerous side stories adding to and painting the bigger picture perfectly. There’s great moments, some apocalyptically wild and some heartfelt and touching. But, Boone keeps the pressure rolling. A military coup, a final queen-sized hatching of new-and-improved spiders and a countdown to the end of days.

It’s a great finish to a very readable set of novels, perfectly balanced between adventure and horror.

Review copy

Published by Gollancz