Archive for February, 2018

If I’ve said it to my wife once, I’ve said it a thousand times; Netflix is crushing it with their original sci-fi series. The Punisher is an excellent example. As a kid, I read some Spider-Man/Punisher crossover comics and, as a teen, I read more Punisher comic books. He’s a great character who populates a space in the superhero landscape that is unique. An anti-hero of sorts but one driven by the most pure albeit tragic of reasons.

The series does an amazing job of bringing that backstory to life, rebooted yet losing none of its power. In fact, it probably adds a layer of moral ambiguity to the character of Frank Castle that firmly places the series at the gritty end of dark. Jon Bernthal fills out the army issue boots of The Punisher in epic fashion with an intensity that is relentless and terrifying.

After dispatching a host of gangsters, drug dealers and mafiosa, who Castle blames for the murder of his wife and children, he is drifting under the radar having faked his own death. But a message from a certain ‘Micro’ brings everything back and uncovers the real power behind the killing of his family.

The dynamic between Frank and Micro is intriguing and complex, moving from enemies to friends and everything in between. The duo are, however, the perfect package to take on an enemy who has all the assets and all the power. Frank’s psychotic drive and ability to rain down death paired with Micro’s technological wizardry is an unstoppable force.

Yet, there are other players in the game such as Homeland Security Agent Madani. A woman compelled to find the truth and very much a white-hat in the story. It complicates Castle’s plans entirely as Madani is determined to bring The Punisher in, thinking he is responsible for all manner of crimes. As things begin to untangle, Madani and Castle begin to co-operate.

The Punisher is a brilliant series. Dark, violent and uncompromising. It also cleverly touches on some serious modern themes around the recent conflicts in the Middle East. But, the finale is one of the most brutal conclusions I’ve seen in screen. One which cleverly leaves an opening for a second series and I can’t wait.

Advertisements

Whilst re-organising my bookshelves, I spied this title nestled in amongst some older fantasy works. In the two brief steps it took to place it with my horror section on the opposite wall, I’d begun to read the opening chapter. I couldn’t remember if I’d read it before or not (I get hit in the head a lot while sparring), but it was intriguing enough that I keep in turning the pages.

It’s an excellent zombie apocalypse novel told through the eyes of an ensemble of characters divided between two locations. The leader of each group is military: General Sherman, an experienced soldier tasked with operations in Africa; and Lieutenant Colonel Anna Demilio, part of the US medical research institute for infections disease stationed in America. Demilio catches wind of the ‘Morningstar Strain’ early on before it begins to really spread, trying, helplessly, to urge her higher-ups to act. Soon enough, however, the infection is taking hold across the African continent, forcing military action to try and quarantine certain countries.

Sherman is at the forefront of this conflict, witnessing the horror of the initial effects of the virus and the consequent reanimation of its victims. Double the zombie, double the mayhem as Recht has mixed ‘sprinters’ and ‘shamblers’ into a nightmarish blend of death. It’s as great as it sounds. Sherman is the reader’s eyes into pitched battles, breathless escapes and brutal violence. Demilio portrays the political side of the problem as she tries to get the truth out only to find herself imprisoned for treason by a very scary NSA trio.

The opening book in a series, it’s a solid, action-packed read. Just the kind of thing I was looking for to accompany my morning coffee.

Published by Permutated Press